Career Programs

The Biophysical Society provides a unique opportunity at the Annual Meeting to attend various sessions focused on finding and securing careers, grants, and publishing papers within the biophysics realm. 

Registration is required for the following events: 
Mid-Career Interactive Forum: The Art and Perils of Networking
Postdoc to Faculty Q & A: Transitions Forum and Luncheon

Registration not required for the following events:
Postdoctoral Breakfast
Moving on from Your Postdoc Position: Negotiating the Transition
Funding: If Not from Federal Agencies, from Where?
Grant Writing Workshop: How (Not) to Write Your NIH Grant Proposal
How to Get Your Scientific Paper Published
Preparing for Promotions: Everything You Wanted to Know but Were Afraid to Ask
Biophysics at the National Large Facilities: Current and Future Science Possibilities
Networking with Minority Biophysicists: Resources and Opportunities
Science and Policy with Steven Chu
The Basics, the Discoveries, and the Controversies: Membrane Protein Structure and Dynamics
PhD Careers Beyond the Bench

Registration for some sessions is recommended due to space limitations.

 

Postdoctoral Breakfast

Sunday, February 16, 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 
Supported by the Burroughs Wellcome Fund

This breakfast presents an opportunity for postdoctoral members of the Society to meet and discuss the issues they face in their current career stage. Members of the Early Careers Committee will discuss careers in industry. They will also be available to answer questions about how the Committee serves postdocs in the biophysical community and to recruit new Committee members. Limited to the first 100 attendees.

Speakers: 

Avia Rosenhouse-Dantsker, University of Illinois at Chicago
Andrew Whitley, HORIBA Instruments, Inc.
 

Mid-Career Interactive Forum: The Art and Perils of Networking 

Sunday, February 16, 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM 

This event, sponsored by the Committee for Professional Opportunities for Women, will accelerate and expand the professional impact of mid-career biophysicists. How can you continue to develop your career AFTER having secured a job and after having established a lab Learn how to increase your impact and to widen your scientific influence beyond the bench. This year's discussion will center on the value of a supportive professional network and will include dos and don'ts of professional interactions. The goal is for you to begin to add to your existing network advisors, mentors, and advocates for the “next step,” which can be serving on grant review panels and editorial boards or becoming more involved with decision-making at your institution and in professional societies. Experienced panelists, including department chairs, society leaders and senior editors will each speak briefly about their own experiences, leading into an extended question-and-answer exchange with the audience. The session will close with small-group and one-on-one interactions aimed to offer more individualized suggestions for career advancement and opportunities for networking. Pre-registration was required for lunch. If you are interested in attending and did not register, you are welcome to participate on a space-available basis.

Speakers: 

Alfred L. George, Jr., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
Ivet Bahar, University of Pittsburgh
Harel Weinstein, Weill Cornell Medical College

Moving on from Your Postdoc Position: Negotiating the Transition

Sunday, February 16, 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

This popular session, hosted by the Early Careers Committee, will provide advice on how to find a permanent position after your postdoctoral training.

Speakers:

Seth Robia, Loyola University, Chicago, Illinois
Stuart Campbell, Yale University
Ravi Balijepalli, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
Marcos Sotomayor, The Ohio State University


Funding: If Not from Federal Agencies, from Where? 

Sunday, February 16, 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM

In this session, experts representing foundations, nonprofits, universities, and business will discuss non-federal sources of research funding, how to pursue them, and whether they present a viable substitute for lost decreased government funding sources. The panelists will also discuss if and how their funding strategies have changed in response to federal funding, how scientists can effectively forge relationships with industry and foundations, and how universities are responding to the changing funding landscape. This session is sponsored by the Public Affairs Committee. 

Speakers:

Robert Conn, President, The Kavli Foundation
Bill Balke, University of California, San Francisco, and American Heart Association
Mark Adams, Scientific Director, J. Craig Venter Institute

Grant Writing Workshop: How (Not) to Write Your NIH Grant Proposal

Monday, February 17, 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Through mock study sections and discussions, veteran NIH officials will demonstrate what review panels look for when they read and assess proposals. They will also answer questions about peer review, avoiding application pitfalls and responding to review concerns. This session is sponsored by the Public Affairs Committee and is appropriate for both experienced principal investigators and those applying for their first grant.

Speakers:

John Bowers, Center for Scientific Review, NIH
Jean Chin, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH
Catherine Lewis, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH
Peter Preusch, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH
Don Schneider, Center for Scientific Review, NIH



How to Get Your Scientific Paper Published

Monday, February 17, 2:15 PM - 3:45 PM

This panel discussion, sponsored by the Publications Committee, will focus on the practical issues involved in publishing a scientific paper. The panelists have extensive experience in writing, reviewing, and editing papers, and will provide information on the 'dos and don'ts of submitting research manuscripts.  Discussions will likely focus on strategies to avoid common pitfalls, how to prevent and fix problems before submission, and how to respond to critiques and even rejection of a paper. Attendees are encouraged to ask questions during the session.

Moderator: Olaf Andersen, Weill Cornell Medical College

Panelists:
Alicia Wallace, Dartmouth Journal Services
Katharina Gaus, University of New South Wales, Australia
Les Loew, University of Connecticut Health Center
Lukas Tamm, University of Virginia


Preparing for Promotions: Everything You Wanted to Know but Were Afraid to Ask

Monday, February 17, 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM

This discussion panel, hosted by the Committee for Professional Opportunities for Women, will offer advice for those seeking advancement in their careers, whether in academia, industry, or other endeavors. Topics to be discussed include the value of mentoring and networking, how you present yourself via your CV, and why these are important to pay attention to as you seek a promotion. The panelists, who include scientists with experience in academic and non-academic institutions, will share their thoughts and advice about this important topic. 

Speakers:
Steve A. N. Goldstein, Brandeis University
Hector Rodriguez, MyoKardia, Inc.
Jil C. Tardiff, University of Arizona
Pamela Tranter, Novartis


Biophysics at the National Large Facilities: Current and Future Science Possibilities

Monday, February 17, 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM

This session will survey a range of techniques available at the national user facilities around the country to elucidate structural information for biomolecules. The standard tools, such as macromolecular crystallography, will be included, as well as up-and-coming techniques such as LCLS-based structure determination. Attendees will also learn how researchers can access and take advantage of these facilities. Sponsored by the Public Affairs Committee. 

Moderators:
Corie Ralston, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab
Ana Gonzalez, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center


Speakers:
Jen Bohon, National Synchrotron Light Source, Case Center for Synchrotron Biosciences
Britt Hedman, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center
Caralyn Larabell, University of California, San Francisco
John Spence, Arizona State University
Peter Zwart, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab


Postdoc to Faculty Q & A: Transitions Forum and Luncheon 

Tuesday, February 18, 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM 

This question-and-answer luncheon, sponsored by the Committee for Professional Opportunities for Women, is designed for postdocs finishing and actively applying for academic faculty positions. New faculty and recently tenured faculty in basic science and/or medical school departments will lead the discussion as well as experienced senior-level faculty who have served as department chairs and/or part of faculty search committees. Topics for discussion include how to prepare the curriculum vitae, the interview process, how to negotiate the job offer, and advice for new faculty as they balance research with their department obligations. Pre-registration was required for lunch. If you are interested in attending and did not register, you are welcome to participate on a space-available basis.

Speakers:

Elizabeth Villa, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry
Sarah Bondos, Texas A&M Health Science
Gabriel Lander, The Scripps Research Institute
Niels Volkmann, Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute
Madeline Shea, University of Iowa

 

Networking with Minority Biophysicists: Resources and Opportunities

Tuesday, February 18, 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
 
This networking event, sponsored by the Minority Affairs Committee, will provide minority students and scientists the opportunity to network and discuss challenges and resources with other minority biophysicists. 

Speaker:
Kamal Shukla, NSF, Molecular and Cellular Biosciences
Parag Chitnis, NSF


Science and Policy with Steven Chu 

Tuesday, February 18, 1:30-2:30 PM

Steven Chu, former US Secretary of Energy, has returned to academia and Stanford University. During this session he will discuss his current research and biophysics research in general, and also reflect on science policy in the US.  


The Basics, the Discoveries, and the Controversies: Membrane Protein Structure and Dynamics

Tuesday, February 18, 2:15-3:30 PM

Attendees at this session will learn about super resolution microscopy techniques for studying membrane proteins and macromolecular complexes in cells, and the type of information this technique can provide a researcher. This session is sponsored by the Education Committee and is intended to introduce the most important ideas, breakthroughs, and outstanding questions of a specific field of Biophysics to help those that do not work directly in that area gain a perspective on what is known and what is unknown.

Speaker: 
Bo Huang, UCSF
The Science of Counting: A Super-resolution View of Membrane Protein Dimerization


PhD Careers Beyond the Bench

Tuesday, February 18, 2:30-4:30 PM

Have you ever wondered how you can apply the skills learned during your PhD in a career away from the bench? The Early Careers Committee is sponsoring a panel to discuss the plethora of career options that exist beyond the bench, such as publishing, science writing, patent law, policy, marketing etc. Panelists involved in a wide variety of careers will share their personal experiences.

Speakers:
Peter Aldhous, Science Journalist and Lecturer, University of California, Santa Cruz Science Communication Program
Walter Ausserer, Director, Marketing, ForteBio, A Division of Pall Life Sciences
Prithwish Pal, Technical Marketing Manager, Invivoscribe Technologies


Additional speakers to be announced.

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